Following the holidays, a lot of us will have new electronics; the latest kitchen appliances, power tools and personal devices to name a few. If you are like me, you’ve got a stash of over the hill and damaged electronics that you’d like to dispose of responsibly. Luckily there is a program in place to help us recycle and reuse components from these broken items, and 2 of our Island Return It Centres in the Cowichan Valley are ready to receive your electronics for drop off. Good news for recycling electronics We take a wide variety of items from TVs, computers, medical devices and phones, etc. These are sorted, palletized and shipped to different specialized EPRA locations (Electronic Producers Recycling Association) throughout Canada. Here reusable components are carefully dismantled by hand, and plastics and metals further machine sorted for recycling, or to be sent back into the manufacturing supply chain. These electronics...

It's official! Our Campbell River, Duncan and Esquimalt locations are now a part of the new MMBC program. Island Return It Recycling Centres can now accept Styrofoam products for responsible disposal, all depots with the exception of Salt Spring Island. This change has been brought about the new MMBC (Multi-Material British Columbia) program, which is a non-profit organization that holds manufacturers and distributors responsible for the disposal management of packaging and printed paper (PPP), similar to the program for recycling beverage containers or light bulbs. The Styrofoam aspect of this new program covers all the most widely used consumer products such as: 1- Foam Drink Cups 2- White & Coloured Meat Trays 3- Foam Packaging for Computers, Electronics & Appliances 4- Egg Cartons 5- Take Out Containers Products We Cannot Accept: - Packing Peanuts - Pool Noodles (Yes. This is tragic with summer just around the corner but don't worry, we've found some awesome ideas for re-purposing your older pool...

  Once upon a time men and women would put the groceries away and without giving it another thought they would scrunch up the plastic bags and shove them into the garbage can. Sometimes, if they were particularly conscientious or on a budget they would reuse those grocery bags as trash can liners. Long term implications of non-biodegradable plastics in landfills wasn't a hot topic and it didn't occur to everyone that these bags might remain as unpleasant reminders of our rampant consumerism for future generations. Enter a new generation of consumers who noticed that decades later, plastic was still hanging around. In fact, it can take roughly 1000 years for a plastic non-biodegradable bag to break down. That's 500 years longer than a disposable diaper, by the way. Talk of recycling plastic and reusing bags soon starts to gain traction, but doesn't catch on as quickly as it should have. Use of...

The concept of recycling has been around for ages, generations have grown up learning about the three Rs (Reduce, Reuse & Recycle) and (at least in this part of the world) there is a negative association with not recycling. Having said that, we know that there is a lot of miss-communication, half truths and gray areas around recycling and we would like to help set the record straight on a few of these recycling myths. [caption id="" align="alignright" width="400"] (Photo credits: www.recyclereminders.com)[/caption] Myth #1 - Recycling is the Only Way to Reduce Trash While recycling is a really great way to reduce trash you can also tackle this issue by shopping mindfully. For example, do you really need the product with all the extra packaging? Could you choose an alternative product to the one packed in Styrofoam? Can you buy in bulk? Can you purchase reusable items instead? Another simple way to reduce your...

First things first, Island Return It Recycling Centres doesn't dispose of unused medications. In Canada, pharmacists are the best bet for this as they have a designated stewardship program in place. When you have unused or expired medications in your home it is important that you dispose of them in a safe and responsible manner. In this blog post, we will explain how to safely remove potentially dangerous narcotics and medications from your home. Toss It?  Nope. The easiest thing to do is to simply throw old medicine into the trash. However, we strongly advise that you not do that! Unused pills might be mistaken for candy by small children and sometimes this leads to tragic results. Likewise if a household pet or wild animal were to get into your garbage. Flush It? Nope. Some drugs are safe to flush down the toilet but not all and because expired medicines are not processed during sewage treatment,...